You have an online ‘influence’ score – and Kred can tell you what it is

WANT to find out if you could be the next superstar influencer? There’s an online tool that can help.

If you’ve ever dreamed of becoming a social media powerhouse – calling in free goodies from top brands – then you need to find out your “social score”.

Want to find out your online influence score? You can do it for free on go.kred.com
Kred

There are lots of different websites that offer this type of scoring system.

But one of the most popular (and best-reviewed) is called Kred, which is free to use if you sign up.

To find your score, you’ll need to link your Twitter and Facebook profiles to Kred.

Then it will track your “Influence Score” and your “Outreach Level” – important stats in this brave new digital world.

Your score is based on your Twitter and Facebook interactions
Kred

“To calculate your Kred, we analyse billions of tweets from the last 1,000 days,” the social media analysers explain.

“We add your Facebook actions when you connect your account.”

So how exactly is your score determined?

The Influence Score is described as your “ability to inspire action”, and is scored on a 1,000-point scale.

This is calculated by tracking how often you are retweeted, replied, mentioned and followed on Twitter.

And if you connect your Facebook account, you’ll also get Influence points when people interact with the content on your wall – and the walls of other Kred users.

Facebook interactions that count include Posts, Mentions, Likes, Shares and even Event Invitations.

But you’ll also get an Outreach Level.

This is used to measure your social “generosity”, which involves engaging with others and “helping them spread their message”.

Your Outreach Level is cumulative and always increases. It’s tracked by measuring your Retweets, Replies and Mentions.

The idea of social scores isn’t a new one, of course.

Hit TV series Black Mirror included an episode called Nosedive, which foretold of a dystopian future where everyone is ranked by a social score.

And in the real world, influencers and social media celebs make staggering amounts of money by posting online – making it an attractive career option.

China is taking the idea of personal scores to the next level, doling out “social credit” scores to citizens.

Jaywalking, failing to pay fines, and general misdeeds can earn you a bad score.

And if your score is particularly bad, you can be denied access to certain loans or public transport.

Do you think social scores are creepy? Let us know in the comments!


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