SPIED: 992 Porsche 911 GT3 to be naturally aspirated?

The 992-generation Porsche 911 GT3 has been spotted testing again in preparation for its eventual debut, as our spy photographers caught a mule circling in and around the Nurburgring Nordschleife. With the standard 992-generation models appearing to be near production ready, the hotter, track-honed version is making strides in development as well.

For now, the front bumper on this development car still appears to be a work in progress, therefore the production car is likely to wear a more conventional three-intake item, rather than the single, central intake bumper akin to that of the 911 RSR racer. As before, centre-locking wheels are present here as on GT3s of the preceding two generations, and are expected to house a choice of steel and carbon-ceramic brakes.

At the rear end, the GT3 continues with tradition in wearing a large spoiler mounted atop the decklid, which itself sports a ducktail spoiler that now terminates at each end beyond the main spoiler uprights. This appears to follow the new design approach that employs a wider retractable spoiler in the standard versions.

Though engine details have yet to be confirmed, our spy photographer sources think the naturally-aspirated 4.0 litre flat-six will remain in place for the coming generation of GT3, with the requisite hike in peak power to about 550 hp. A quick-shifting dual-clutch automatic with limited-slip differential for the driven rear wheels is a near-certainty, though the fate of one with three pedals is less definite.

The GT3 has been complemented with an RS model in every iteration since the 996 facelift, and the eventual 992 version will have more of everything that distinguishes the GT3. For now, the 992-generation 911 GT3 is expected to take its bow at the next Frankfurt Motor Show in September 2019, with the base Carrera models set to debut earlier.






























The post SPIED: 992 Porsche 911 GT3 to be naturally aspirated? appeared first on Paul Tan's Automotive News.

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