Letters: Aug. 13

If you build it . . .

Regarding the letter Cycling not so big (Aug. 9).

One doesn’t justify building a bridge by counting how many people try to swim across a river. It’s only when the bridge is built that people cross.

Cycling infrastructure is much the same; there’s an “if you build it, they will come” effect. Each city that’s implemented a protected cycling network has seen significant increases in ridership. One such city is Edmonton — yes, that Edmonton — which has dedicated resources to bike lane snow removal, making cycling viable year-round.

Doug Morrow’s arrogant “common sense” argument is off the mark. A huge reason why many people drive instead of cycle is because cycling is unsafe in London. It’s not because they love the tremendous cost, constant stress, countless negative health outcomes and staggering environmental toll resulting from driving; it’s because the choice between cycling or getting home alive is an easy one.

Theo Larsen

London

Room for Canadians

Foreign nationals have been admitted to Canadian universities in greater numbers than reasonable because of their higher tuition fees, displacing well-qualified Canadians paying much lower tuition. Saudi Arabia is a small country. Since the removal of Saudi students and post-graduate medical residents is creating such a large problem in Canada, this indicates that wealth has resulted in a disproportionate representation of Saudis in Canadian medical schools.

Gavin Hamilton

London

Why eight bloacks?

Regarding the article Adelaide underpass preferred, city staff say (Aug. 9).

City staff have recommended an underpass at Adelaide Street stretching from Queens Avenue to Oxford Street at a cost of $58.3 million. As a daily user of Adelaide for almost 40 years I have long advocated for an underpass or overpass to eliminate the numerous daily traffic delays this crossing engenders. But why does it have to stretch for eight blocks when the underpasses on both Richmond Street and Wellington Road, which run for only one block? And why at such an exorbitant cost? Only the city can contract a project at double or triple the cost that it could otherwise be done. Reduce the number of blocks and you reduce the cost.

John Lisowski

London

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