Denver sheriff’s deputy used an insulting slur when addressing an autistic jail inmate. Now, he’s been suspended.

A Denver Sheriff Department deputy was suspended for 30 days after using a slur to question an inmate’s intellect.

Deputy Ryan Bosveld already served 20 days of the suspension without pay in October. Bosveld will be docked 10 percent of his wages for 10 pay periods for the remainder of the penalty.

Bosveld violated a departmental policy by harassing a prisoner and when asked to recount the incident on paper he gave a misleading statement that left out his calling an inmate a slur, according to a copy of Bosveld’s disciplinary letter obtained by The Denver Post.

The incident happened on Nov. 10, 2017. The inmate, identified only by the initials W.W., said Bosveld asked him, “What are you (slur)?” W.W. explained that he has autism and that he is “slow.” The inmate filed a grievance, saying he was offended by the name calling.

Bosveld’s report of the incident said that he repeatedly had to tell W.W. at 8 p.m., that he was not allowed to use the phone because his jail pod was locked down for the night, the letter said.

When an investigator later questioned Bosveld about the incident, he readily admitted calling the inmate a slur and that he knew he had made a mistake. Bosveld said his sergeant told him to leave out that part, according to the disciplinary letter.

But the sergeant who Bosveld had accused of a cover-up denied the allegation, saying he ordered Bosveld to write down the incident as it happened and warned, “Your mouth is going to get you fired.” Another sergeant, who witnessed the discussion about the incident, corroborated the sergeant’s version.

The incident wasn’t the first time Bosveld had gotten into trouble for verbal exchanges with inmates.

In 2016, Bosveld had been suspended for 10 days after telling an inmate who was shouting obscenities at him that he would rather have sexual intercourse with that inmate’s mother.

A suicidal inmate also had claimed that Bosveld told him to “just die.” That suspension later was overturned during an appeals hearing.

***

Note from WSOE.Org : This content has been auto-generated from a syndicated feed.