BONOKOSKI: James Comey is all Donald Trump calls him, and more

While fired FBI director James Comey will thicken his wallet with the publication of his snitch-all memoir, A Higher Loyalty, he will go down in American history as a crybaby Judas worth barely a footnote.

U.S. President Donald Trump has him nailed down.

Comey is a proven liar, a leaker of classified documents, as well as each and every pejorative noun and adjective Trump can muster to describe the head G-man he tossed out of office almost a year ago. (Comey claimed under oath for example, that he never leaked to the media — then later admitted he “asked a friend” to leak a memo from his a meeting with Trump to the New York Times.)

While Trump was riffing on his Twitter feed Friday that Comey was an “untruthful slimeball,” the Republican National Committee went on the offence with a website — lyincomey.com — in which even senior Democrats like minority leader Nancy Pelosi were quoted as having dissed Comey prior to the election as “maybe not in the right job,” and no longer worthy of confidence.

The basis for Comey’s 290-pages of obsessive vitriol, due to hit bookshelves on Tuesday, is simple. Comey wanted to make sure there wasn’t an American still alive who didn’t know he hated Trump with a passion.

Those who hate Trump with equal vigour — the mainstream media, the progressives, the Hollywood elites — will naturally love it.

For the rest of us, it’s old news.

There appeared, however, that there was no road too low to go when it comes to Comey, who even took to physical ridicule to discredit Trump.

“His face appeared slightly orange with bright white half-moons under his eyes where I assumed he placed small tanning goggles,” wrote Comey. “(He had) impressively coiffed, bright blond hair, which upon close inspection looked to be all his.”

In this this Jan. 22, 2017, file photo, Vice President Mike Pence, left, and Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy stand as President Donald Trump shakes hands with then-FBI Director James Comey. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

This comes from a man who once headed the most powerful police and investigation force in the United States, not some two-bit gossip columnist for a supermarket rag where aliens dominate the front pages.

Who, therefore, is the embarrassment here?

It is mind-boggling how people continue to misunderstand Trump.

He has called NAFTA the worst deal ever, accused it of ripping off billions from America, and how he wanted to tear it up.

Now, suddenly, a deal is possible.

The mainstream media, in particular, continue to loathe him so much that they refuse to see that Trump employs symbolic messaging to get what he wants. He lays out his intentions, publicly flaunts his willingness to be disagreeable on just about everything, and then sits back to watch it all play out as the situations shift closer to what he wants.

His book, Trump: The Art of the Deal, lays it all out

President Donald Trump signs a copy of his book, “The Art of the Deal,” while greeting people before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn to depart the White House, Thursday, April 5, 2018 in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Donald Trump keeps talking about building a wall between Mexico and the United States. But there will never be a wall.

The wall is a metaphor. It speaks to the frustration of middle and lower-income families in America who see illegal immigrants from Mexico coming into their country who are willing to work for cheap wages and no benefits.

Middle America hears him talk about the wall, and they vote for him.

In this March 13, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump talks with reporters as he reviews border wall prototypes in San Diego. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, file)

Again, when it comes to NAFTA, Trump rails about his expectation of concessions being made, threatens to pull out if he cannot wring out those concessions, and American workers cheer him on.

Same with the Trans Pacific Partnership, the biggest free trade deal the world has ever seen.

Right from the outset, Trump wanted no part of it. He wanted his America First to rule the deal, and he saw the TPP as unable to deliver.

How he wants his trade envoys to talk their way in.

To paraphrase Winston Churchill, Trump is “a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.”

But he is not impossible to forecast.

In fact, he is utterly transparent.

markbonokoski@gmail.com

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