1993 Porsche 911 Turbo Does Away With Subtleties, Goes OTT

In many customers’ opinion, Porsches are just perfect in the state the leave the factory in. Others, however, are not that concerned about retaining the purity of their ride so they inevitable turn to tuners.

You’d be excused for not knowing Wagenbauanstalt, as it’s not as famous as, say, Singer. Also, unlike Singer, the Hamburg-based firm modifies only one car each year, usually “in the middle six-digit price segment”, as per their own estimates.

“We are the smallest manufacturer in Germany. We complete one vehicle per year. A tailored suit on four wheels. That’s what we call drivable art”, said Wagenbauanstalt’s founder, Oliver Kaps. The owner is assisted in his projects by different coach builders, saddlers and engine specialists, and the result is one unique ride.

Also Read: Porsche’s Project Gold 993 Turbo Sells In 10 Minutes, Fetches $3 Million

Their latest build is a 1993 911 Turbo. The car benefits from new sheet metal that replaces the original’s wheel arches, doors, fenders and side panels. The widened model has modified bumpers, sills and a large rear wing, in addition to a rear muffler with a catalytist, all of them made in-house by Wagenbauanstalt.

It also features a special paint job, applied in 30 layers, and Wheel-Tec 24 rims. The tuner says the retro-styled lights were obtained from the Kaege program, whereas the engine, transmission and brakes, as well as the beige interior, are from Porsche.

This 911 Turbo also has door openers sourced from a 1940s Lincoln, hand-polished decoration in Candy Gold and a cup-style rollover cage. The final upgrade is the Wagenbauanstalt logo, in 24-carat gold, that’s produced by Robbe & Berking in Flensburg.

While the end result belies the work that has gone into this project and the huge rear arches are striking, we think that, if we had six figures to spend on a 911, we’d probably go for an understated, yet much less flash and still exquisitely put together, Singer. Wouldn’t you?


















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